CASE SUMMARIES

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on students to seek diagnosis and provide appropriate evidence - PI091403

London Metropolitan University

We found a case Not Justified where a student at London Metropolitan University appealed against a decision to terminate her studies based on poor attendance due to a health condition. The student had successfully appealed against an earlier decision to terminate her studies and at that stage had been directed to the Disabilities and Dyslexia Service but had chosen not to use this service.

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on students to follow procedures - PI091405

University of Bedfordshire

A student at the University of Bedfordshire appealed against the University’s decision to require her to repeat part of an academic year, on the grounds that she had been unwell during the assessment period. She did not make a mitigating circumstances claim at the time of the assessments. She was unable to provide medical evidence covering the period of the assessments, instead providing a letter from a doctor in her home country, written before the assessment period, outlining her medical history. She indicated that she was used to self–prescribing and had not visited a doctor in the UK.

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on students to follow procedures - PI091406

Cardiff Metropolitan University

Cardiff Metropolitan University considered a stage one complaint about disability support in the summer of 2011. The University did not uphold the complaint and wrote to the student explaining that he had ten days to submit a written request for a stage two review.

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on universities to document how they have supported students with disabilities - PI091407

Oxford Brookes University

A student at Oxford Brookes University complained that her request for an extension to a submission deadline under the mitigating circumstances procedures had been rejected. The student had dyslexia but had forgotten to take all her IT equipment on an overseas trip at the time the assignment was due. This meant she did not have access to IT equipment and assistive technology that had been provided by the University.

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on universities to document how they have supported students with disabilities - PI091408

University of Oxford

In considering a number of aspects to a complaint brought by a student at the University of Oxford, who had both disability and specific medical conditions, we found that the University could not demonstrate that it had looked at whether medical issues could have affected performance on the day of the examinations.

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on universities to document how they have supported students with disabilities - PI091409

University College London

In considering issues related to discrimination we do not act as a court. We don't investigate or make legal findings in the same manner as a court. However, we do refer to the law and guidance on discrimination to form an opinion as to good practice and to decide whether the University has acted fairly.

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on universities to document how they have supported students with disabilities - PI091410

City University London

City University was unable to provide evidence that it had taken full account of a student’s late diagnosis of dyslexia in considering her appeal against the marks awarded for her coursework and examination papers. We found that the University had no provision in its regulations for dealing with late diagnosis.

Disability and ill-health: Responsibility on universities to document how they have supported students with disabilities - PI091411

Falmouth University

We found a complaint from a student at Falmouth University Partly Justified because the University could provide only a copy of an email sent to the student’s academic department which gave a list of students with disabilities and generic advice sheets on supporting students with dyslexia and dyspraxia.